About banner 3 | Rosemary Inn

About Rosemary Inn Bed & Breakfast

Historic Bed & Breakfast

Experience history, elegance and romance not offered by competing hotels in North Augusta, SC

Meet The Innkeepers

Innerkeeper Photo | Rosemary Inn

Kelly and Diana Combs moved to North Augusta from California in 2009. Diana is a Nebraska native and Kelly grew up in Southern California. The two met and wed while attending the University of Nebraska after which they moved to California to start a career and family.

Diana devoted much of her time to raising their two children, Sarah and Caroline. Diana also ran a home business of hosting regularly scheduled themed and catered luncheons for women. Based out of their home in Yucaipa, it was a great success with over 400 registered participants and enabled Diana to perfect her hospitality and creative event planning skills.

Kelly worked primarily in the medical device sales and sales management businesses. In the late 1990's he and his two physician brothers developed a medical office building in Temecula, California leading to Kelly starting a medical office development and construction company.

Kelly and Diana purchased Rosemary Hall in September 2009. Diana and Kelly have twin goals of preservation of North Augusta's iconic structures and creating an exceptional experience for guests.

The combination of Diana's event planning and execution skills with Kelly's experience in construction and commercial real estate development and management has prepared them well for creating an exceptional guest experience and ensuring that Rosemary Inn Bed and Breakfast will be preserved for future generations

SCETV Features Rosemary - May 2012

Rosemary Inn Bed and Breakfast is the former home of James U. Jackson, the founder of North Augusta. Once called Rosemary Hall, the inn not only offers guests spacious rooms and breakfast but a chance to experience the history of the home.

We are also listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the Nation's official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation.

Reviews